May 23, 2015

second most blog

This week we’re taking a look at what I think is the second most important part of filmmaking.

 

This week we’ve once again left the normal DSLRguide set for different kind of episode. This episode was a direct result of an email I got this week. Thanks Sonat Duyar!  I’m trying to develop a more engaging style for these episodes, rather than always defaulting to the sitting-at-a-desk-talking setup. 

CHECK OUT THIS WEEK’S EPISODE OF DSLR GUIDE:

MAKING OF THIS EPISODE:

FILMING:

Gaffers tape on some weights with some white chalk pen writing. Perfect for symbolising carrying the weight of lots of different roles in filmmaking! The rest of the filming was pretty standard, just ticking off everything I needed from the shot list in my brain.

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MUSIC:

I wanted this edit a decent rhythm, so I started with a bass line with some groove, and developed some percussion as the backbone for the entire video. Then I just built it out, adding some ups and downs through the arrangement. Nothing fancy, just the inbuilt Logic instruments, and barely any mixing except for panning + some filtering at the beginning.

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EDITING:

I always like to see what other people’s timelines look like at the end of a project. Along the top is the footage in blue, and sound effects below. The music is right at the bottom, and then the dialog below that.

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VFX:

For a video about collaboration, I still did this entirely by myself, meaning that I cloned myself to illustrate what it’s like to collaborate. The irony. I’m very glad to have masks in FCPX now, was able to keyframe a few to get this result, without switching to another program.

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INSTAGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

A photo posted by Simon Cade (@cadevisuals) on

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Simon Cade

Filmmaker, and host of DSLRguide. Since I was making my first film age 11, I have always been fascinated by the way films are produced, and the effect it can have on the audience.

  • Murph

    “A writer needs a pen, an artist needs a brush, but a filmmaker needs an army.”
    ― Orson Welles