October 25, 2015

moeny blog

For a lot of people, ‘living the dream’ would mean making their own films for a living.

THIS WEEK’S DSLR GUIDE:

Four ways to support ourselves as filmmakers:

 COMMERCIAL:

Most companies have an advertising budget. More than ever before, they are expected to promote themselves with video, and that’s where the filmmakers come in.

INDEPENDENT:

We often hear about the struggles of independent filmmakers. Putting their own money down to get their films made, so they can retain full ownership and creative control.
If you can build an audience, there are ways that narrative films / docs can support you:
1. Pay-per-view: On sites like Vimeo, filmmakers can sell their films, often for around $5.00.

2. Adsense on YouTube: As a YouTube partner, you can earn a fraction of a penny every time someone watches an advert on one of your videos. It translates to (very roughly) between $1-$3 per thousand views.

3. Branding / Product Placement: While Adsense has a very low CPM (how much they pay you per 1000 monetised views), companies can offer you much better deals to feature their products/services inside your video, rather than in the pre-rolls.

4. Crowd-funding: Using a site like Indiegogo, Kickstarter or Patreon, the audience can pay to get the film made. Often there are perks such as merchandise or Skypes with the cast and crew as an incentive for larger donations.

TRADITIONAL:

This was pretty much the only option just a few years ago.  You’ve probably heard this before – the idea is that we do whatever we can on a film set, in the hopes that we’ll get hired for something and begin working our way up the ranks.

SELLING FOOTAGE:

The best thing about selling stock footage is that you can just upload a bunch of footage, and then you’re done. No distribution, just a simple way to make some extra money on the side.

Check it out here:

pond5.com/dslrguide

SOCIAL MEDIA ROUNDUP:

A photo posted by Simon Cade (@cadevisuals) on

 

Simon Cade

Filmmaker, and host of DSLRguide. Since I was making my first film age 11, I have always been fascinated by the way films are produced, and the effect it can have on the audience.