April 4, 2015

learn photography blog
This week we’re looking at what photography can teach us about filmmaking, specifically cinematography.

 

Recently I’ve been getting into casual photography, taking enough pictures on my phone to post a photo on instagram every day. In just over 100 days, I’ve already learned more than I had expected to learn.

INSTAGRAM: @CADEVISUALS

CHECK OUT THIS WEEK’S DSLR GUIDE:

some photographers that inspire me:

 

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Beth Ellis                                          brik Dirk Bakker

danny Danny Mota                                    patrick Patrick Kolts

katie Katie Goldie                                    andrew Andrew Pavlidis

TIP #1: GET INSPIRED

Whether it’s colour, shape, framing, lighting, locations, or any of the other elements of photography, there’s a lot we can learn from each other. We are all influenced by the things we see, so it doesn’t hurt to put some high quality images in front of your eyes. The key is to find photos that you find interesting, and ask yourself what makes them a strong photo?

TIP #2: USE A CHEAP CAMERA

We all know how easy it is to fall into gear obsession, so I think one of the best ways to combat that is to limit yourself with equipment. I only use my phone to take pictures, leaving the heavy DSLR with it’s high resolution RAW images at home. Using just one lens forces you to move around and try different angles rather than just zooming in, and the limited colour depth and dynamic range mean that you can’t be lazy. It’s not that better cameras are worse, it’s just that I’ve really learned a lot from forcing myself to make the best of a cheap camera.

TIP #3: CONTRAST

It’s definitely worth doing colour correction and grading on your images, something that we could all do with practicing. So adding a simple contrast S curve in something like GIMP or photoshop really does go a long way. More important than that is to think about contrast when you’re looking for shots – contrast between bright colours and dull colours, between highly detailed areas of the frame and a simple parts – more on this in the annotations below.

STORYTELLING WITH A SINGLE IMAGE.

Here’s a list of very powerful ad campaigns that have a lot of meaning without any audio, backstory etc.

POWERFUL SOCIAL ISSUES ADS

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ANNOTATED PHOTOS:

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TAGS:
Simon Cade

Filmmaker, and host of DSLRguide. Since I was making my first film age 11, I have always been fascinated by the way films are produced, and the effect it can have on the audience.

  • Olerud_4_Life

    Dude learning a lot from your pieces. Great job.

  • Johan

    Truth. I would add that photography is very disposable. Because of this quality, there is less risk. Risk is synonymous with distraction and stressful. It’s one to say to a photographer, photography a location with your iPhone whenever you get a chance. You will get a different photo than someone who is told to photography a location within 8 hours, while directing actors, and managing a crew. Haha. But nonetheless it is good practice. Another note is to shoot in RAW. Why? Because RAW gives you the ability to revisit the location and make changes to color, sharpness, exposure, and contrast and compare two images side by side. When others ask why my films look more “cinematic”, it’s because I practice photography.